Jon Hurdle

Jon is an experienced journalist who has covered a wide range of general and business-news stories for national and local media in the U.S. and his native U.K. As a former Reuters reporter, he spent several years covering the early stages of Pennsylvania’s natural gas fracking boom and was one of the first national reporters to write about the effects of gas development on rural communities. Jon trained as a general news reporter with a British newspaper chain and later worked for several business-news organizations including Bloomberg News and Market News International, covering topics including economics, bonds, currencies and monetary policy. Since 2011, he has been a freelance writer, contributing Philadelphia-area news to The New York Times; covering economics for Market News, and writing stories on the environment and other subjects for a number of local outlets including StateImpact. He has written two travel guidebooks to the European Alps; lived in Australia, Switzerland, Israel, and Saudi Arabia, and visited many countries including Ethiopia, Peru, Taiwan, and New Zealand. Outside of work hours, Jon can be found running, birding, cooking, and, when weather permits, gardening in the back yard of a Philadelphia row home where he lives with his partner, Kate.

Latest by Jon Hurdle


A sign on the side of a barn on Riegelsville Road in Holland Township, New Jersey, shows local opposition to the PennEast pipeline.

PennEast pipeline can take New Jersey lands using eminent domain, judge rules

A federal judge rejected arguments that approval for the pipeline isn’t final. The ruling affects the properties of about 150 landowners.

By Jon Hurdle

Construction on the Mariner East 2 pipeline has faced myriad problems, including damaged water supplies and sinkholes in a residential neighborhood in Chester County.
Updated: December 11, 2018 | 4:11 pm

Judge denies emergency petition for Mariner East shutdown

Suit brought by seven residents fails on all four requirements
By Jon Hurdle

A yard sign opposing the planned PennEast pipeline. New Jersey officials said they need much more information before making a decision on permits.

Judge grants first eminent domain case to PennEast in Pennsylvania

Company says ruling will allow it complete surveys; N.J. landowners await ruling from another judge
By Jon Hurdle

In this photo from May 2018, pipeline workers probe the ground on Lisa Drive in West Whiteland Township where sinkholes have developed as a result of the Mariner East 2 construction.

Delaware County study: Pipeline blast could be devastating, but risk is low

An independent consultant’s risk assessment said someone would be more likely to die from falling down stairs than in a pipeline explosion. Yet a leak would be more likely to ignite in a densely populated area because there are more ignition sources.

By Jon Hurdle

Energy Transfer Partners, the parent company of Mariner East 2 pipeline builder, Sunoco, works at Snitz Creek in West Cornwall Township, Lebanon County after a drilling mud spill during the summer.

Residents urge PUC to halt Mariner East operation, hold hearing on emergency plans

Petition says Sunoco has not done enough to prepare communities for any leak of natural gas liquids
By Jon Hurdle

An environmental cleanup crew works to remove fuel from a spill in Darby Creek in Tinicum Township, Pennsylvania, near the Philadelphia International Airport. Sunoco plans to use this same line to ship natural gas liquids until construction along the Mariner East 2 is completed.

ME2 12-inch pipe passed safety inspections, PUC tells school superintendents

The line, built in the 1930s and upgraded in 2016, is among three that Sunoco plans to use as a substitute for Mariner East 2 while construction on that project is finished. Three school superintendents had asked PUC to help assess the line’s safety.

By Jon Hurdle

Mariner East 2 pipeline construction along Zinns Mill Road in Lebanon County August 24, 2018.
Updated: November 8, 2018 | 4:36 pm

Sunoco expects hybrid Mariner East 2 to start operating by year’s end

The company has joined three different lines to create a cross-state route for natural gas liquids. It says it will be able to fulfill customer orders.

By Jon Hurdle

Mariner East 2 pipeline construction crews work in the backyards of homes on Lisa Drive in West Whiteland Township, Chester County, on May 2. Sinkholes that opened in the area prompted the state's Public Utility Commission to order that an existing pipeline nearby, the Mariner East 1, be shut down until it could be determined that the sinkholes didn't threaten its safety. PUC on May 3 approved a re-start of Mariner East 1.
Updated: October 23, 2018 | 5:21 pm

Sunoco: Mariner East 2 delayed to 2020, so company will join three pipes as substitute

The cross-state natural gas liquids pipeline Mariner East 2 was supposed to begin operation by the end of September. Now, the company has come up with a workaround after acknowledging another lengthy delay in its pipeline project.

By Jon Hurdle

Workers installing the Mariner East 2 pipeline August 22, 2018 in Lebanon County. Energy Transfer Partners, parent company of Sunoco Logistics, had told investors that the line would be operational by the end of September. But regulatory issues have held it up.

‘Regulatory issues’ delay opening of Sunoco’s Mariner East 2 pipeline

The company missed its deadline of opening the line by the end of September. The Public Utility Commission said there are several issues with the project that still need to be resolved.

By Jon Hurdle

Energy Transfer Partners, the parent company of Mariner East 2 pipeline builder, Sunoco, works at Snitz Creek in West Cornwall Township, Lebanon County after a drilling mud spill during the summer.

Mariner East 2: Sunoco’s incidents, fines and shutdowns fuel residents’ safety concerns

As part of the “Mariner East 2: At what risk?” series, StateImpact Pennsylvania reports how pipeline opponents say Sunoco’s construction makes them worried about the volatile liquids flowing through the line. The data can be useful, but there may be more to the story, two experts said.

By Jon Hurdle
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