Scott Blanchard

Scott Blanchard became StateImpact Pennsylvania’s editor in November 2017. He had been enterprise editor at the York (Pa.) Daily Record, where he led the newsroom’s investigative and projects reporting. The team produced investigations with statewide impact on subjects including domestic violence, gun laws and clergy abuse. Blanchard arrived in York in 2001 and helped lead national award-winning coverage of the 30-year-old York riots murders investigation. In years since, he has focused on narrative storytelling, ethics and training, with special emphasis on trauma journalism. He was a 2013 Ochberg Fellow, receiving training at Columbia University in PTSD science, self-help and peer support. He led a team that created a trauma awareness/peer-support program in Digital First Media in 2014. Under new owner Gannett, he helped and/or led trauma awareness and peer support training at newsrooms in York, Wilmington, Del., St. Cloud, Minn., Wausau, Wisc. and Milwaukee, Wisc. as well as at the Pennsylvania Newsmedia Association in Harrisburg. He is a past president of the Pennsylvania Society of News Editors (2015-16). Blanchard grew up in Rockville, Md. and is a University of Missouri graduate.

Latest by Scott Blanchard


StateImpact Pennsylvania reporter Amy Sisk, left, with panelists Paulina Jaramillo, Greg Reed and Ivonne Peña at a public event in Pittsburgh Tuesday Jan. 29 called

‘energy, explained’ podcast: Climate change’s big question: Can we get to zero carbon?

At a Jan. 29 public event, three experts peered into the future — near-term and long-term

By Scott Blanchard

FILE PHOTO: Newsmen and spectators stand in front of the main gate of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Generating Station in Middletown, Penn., April 2, 1979.

‘I remember TMI’: An oral history of the 1979 Three Mile Island accident as told by people who lived nearby

Seven residents tell their stories of uncertainty, confusion, fear and the decision they faced: Stay home amid risk of radiation, or flee.

By Scott Blanchard

StateImpact

In this photo, from 2015 Joe Main, third from left, Assistant Secretary of Labor for Mine Safety and Health, and Patricia Silvey, center, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Operations with MSHA, speak with workers at the Gibson North mine, in Princeton, Ind. Federal mining regulators in December 2017 indicated they were reconsidering rules meant to protect underground miners from breathing coal and rock dust - the cause of black lung - and diesel exhaust, which can cause cancer.

‘energy, explained’ podcast: The black lung disease epidemic that ‘shouldn’t have happened’

NPR reporter Howard Berkes joins StateImpact’s Reid Frazier to discuss regulatory failures — and the human cost, including to Pennsylvania miners — of a disease that has been described as ‘suffocating while alive.’

By Scott Blanchard

About 140 people attended

StateImpact Pennsylvania invites public to forum in Pittsburgh on the climate change challenge

Energy Innovation Center is the site for the Jan. 29 event
By Scott Blanchard

Energy Transfer, the parent company of Mariner East 2 pipeline builder, Sunoco, works at Snitz Creek in West Cornwall Township, Lebanon County after a drilling mud spill during the summer.

Mariner East 2 pipeline is up and running, Sunoco says

The project faced multiple regulatory setbacks and was already 18 months behind schedule when it missed a September start-up target. It still faces a hearing before the PUC and a criminal investigation by the Chester County district attorney.

By Scott Blanchard

In this April 23, 2010 photo, a Chesapeake Energy natural gas well site is seen near Burlington, Pa., in Bradford County. So vast is the wealth of natural gas locked into dense rock deep beneath Pennsylvania, New York, West Virginia and Ohio that some geologists estimate it's enough to supply the entire East Coast for 50 years. But freeing it requires a powerful drilling process called hydraulic fracturing or


The Pine Creek Gorge, also known as Pennsylvania's
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