Tom Johnson, NJ Spotlight

Tom Johnson is the energy and environment reporter for NJ Spotlight. He is a journalist with more than 30 years of experience in reporting and editing at New Jersey newspapers. A veteran reporter for The Newark Star-Ledger, Johnson worked in the Statehouse and in Newark covering energy, environmental and telecommunications issues. Before that he served as editor of the Ridgewood Newspapers and a reporter and editor at the Herald-News. A recipient of many state and national journalism honors, including recognition by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for coverage of the environment, he was a member of the Star-Ledger’s nationally award-winning business section. After leaving the Ledger in early 2009, he served as press secretary to the Daggett Campaign for Governor. He lives in Plainfield, N.J. tjohnson@njspotlight.com

Latest by Tom Johnson, NJ Spotlight


A view of the Delaware River from Milford, Pa. The  Delaware River Basin Commission has proposed a fracking ban in the basin, but New Jersey's governor wants the commission to ban related activities as well.

New Jersey governor: Ban fracking, all related activities in Delaware River Basin

New prohibitions would be a big victory for environmentalists and residents who have been campaigning for them for years.

By Tom Johnson, NJ Spotlight

In this Feb. 25, 2010, file photo, an Exelon Corp. employee walks past equipment in the turbine building at the Oyster Creek Generating Station, a nuclear power plant in Lacey Township, N.J. Shutting down the site of the nation's oldest nuclear power plant will take 60 years and cost $1.4 billion, according to a plan filed May 21, 2018, by a subsidiary of Chicago-based Exelon Corp. and under review by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Sale of Oyster Creek nuclear plant could speed decommissioning by decades

Environmentalists happy facility would be cleaned up faster than originally planned, but concerned about details
By Tom Johnson, NJ Spotlight

In a 2-1 ruling, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit found that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission failed properly quantify greenhouse gas emissions linked to a pipeline expansion project in the southeastern U.S.

A sign on farmland in Palmerton shows local opposition to the PennEast pipleline. Some believe land under the Farmland Preservation program has been targeted for the route because of it's lower market value. (Emma Lee/WHYY)

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