Marie Cusick

As the Harrisburg reporter for StateImpact Pennsylvania, Marie Cusick covers energy and environmental issues for public radio stations statewide. She’s also part of NPR’s energy and environment team, which coordinates coverage between the network and select member station reporters around the country. Her work frequently airs on NPR shows including Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition. Since 2012, Marie has closely followed the political, social, environmental, and economic effects of Pennsylvania’s natural gas boom. Her work has been recognized at the regional and national levels– honors include a Sigma Delta Chi Award from the Society of Professional Journalists and a national Edward R. Murrow Award from the Radio Television Digital News Association. Previously, Marie was a multimedia reporter for WMHT in Albany, New York and covered technology for the station’s statewide public affairs TV show, New York NOW. In 2018, she became StateImpact’s first FAA-licensed drone pilot.

Latest by Marie Cusick


A waterfall in Ricketts Glen State Park.

Watch this week: The story of environmental rights in Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania was among the first governments in the world to guarantee its citizens the right to a clean environment. In practice, that didn’t mean much — until now.

By Marie Cusick

(AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

House panel to take up gas royalties bill, but not the one advocates hoped for

A group representing Pennsylvania’s mineral owners has been pushing for different legislation that’s been stalled in Harrisburg for years.  

By Marie Cusick

Atlantic Sunrise Pipeline construction in Lancaster County. (March 2018)

Atlantic Sunrise pipeline goes into full service this weekend

Pipeline is one of many large-scale projects transporting Marcellus gas
By Marie Cusick

An aerial view of Mariner East 2 pipeline construction, adjacent to the Fairview Golf Course in Lebanon County August 24, 2018.

We’re wired to be wary of certain things. Here’s why pipelines are among them

As part of the “Mariner East 2: At what risk?” series, StateImpact Pennsylvania reports that pipelines are not likely to explode, but sometimes, they do — and that makes a huge impression on our brains.

By Marie Cusick

Natural gas wells in Springville Township, Pa.

Shale industry: taxpayers should foot part of the bill for oil and gas oversight

The gas trade group, the Marcellus Shale Coalition, says it pays for nearly all Pennsylvania’s oil and gas program, but it only accounts for part of the program’s work.

By Marie Cusick

Methane leaks throughout the entire process of developing natural gas-- from well sites, to storage and processing facilities and pipelines.

DEP moving forward with emission rules for existing oil and gas sources

The rules the DEP is crafting for existing sources will target volatile organic compounds

By Marie Cusick

Mariner East 2 pipeline construction in Lebanon County August 24, 2018

Cumberland County criticizes Mariner East 2 pipeline builder for dodging safety questions

Cumberland County commissioners say the company has turned a deaf ear to residents’ safety concerns

By Marie Cusick

The Jökulsárlón glacial lagoon in southeastern Iceland.

Can social media actually help curb partisanship around issues like climate change?

New research shows social media platforms can be designed to help people with different political views learn about and discuss complex, controversial topics.

By Marie Cusick

In this July 27, 2018, photo the Dave Johnson coal-fired power plant is silhouetted against the morning sun in Glenrock, Wyo.

New study finds climate change will dramatically alter Earth’s ecosystems

The study showed landscapes across the globe will change dramatically — threatening biodiversity and many natural systems humans rely on.

By Marie Cusick

Homes damaged along the New Jersey Shore after Hurricane Sandy in 2012. (b0jangles via Flickr Creative Commons: https://bit.ly/1mhaR6e)

Study: Sea level rise already hurting coastal real estate prices

Homes exposed to rising seas are selling for about seven percent less than similar properties that aren’t at risk.

By Marie Cusick
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