Katie Meyer / WITF

Katie Meyer is WITF’s Capitol bureau chief, and she covers all things state politics for public radio stations throughout Pennsylvania. Katie came to Harrisburg by way of New York City, where she worked at Fordham University’s public radio station, WFUV, as an anchor, general assignment reporter, and co-host of an original podcast. A 2016 graduate of Fordham, she earned several awards for her work at WFUV, including four 2016 Gracies.

Katie is a native New Yorker, though she originally hails from Troy, a little farther up the Hudson River. She can attest that the bagels are still pretty good there.

The Capitol Bureau Chief Desk is partially funded through generous gifts made in the memory of Tony May through the Anthony J. May Memorial Fund.

For more information about Tony May, click here.

Latest by Katie Meyer


Pollution coming from a coal burning power plant.

Wolf’s cap-and-trade proposal takes a step forward

The Democratic governor issued an executive order declaring Pennsylvania would join a regional agreement aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Not everyone is on board.

By Katie Meyer

Governor Tom Wolf delivers his 2020-21 budget address in Harrisburg on Tuesday, February 4, 2020.

Some lawmakers think they can override Wolf’s veto on manufacturing tax break bill

Overrides are rare, and can only happen when two-thirds of the legislature are willing to support a bill against the governor’s explicit wishes. The last one happened a decade ago.

By Katie Meyer

Wolf dusts off $4.5 billion infrastructure plan

The governor first introduced Restore PA last year, to a chilly response from Republicans. It’s one of several unsuccessful proposals he is reiterating ahead of his 2020 budget address.

By Katie Meyer

A conventional drilling site is prepared in Butler County, Pennsylvania in the winter of 2014.

Wolf says despite GOP compromise, drilling bill still poses too much environmental risk

Republicans are pushing for looser regulations on conventional oil and gas drillers, who generally run small operations and work with relatively shallow wells.
By Katie Meyer

In this Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2019 photo, pipes lay along a construction site on the Mariner East pipeline in a residential neighborhood in Exton, Pa.

Cumberland County man may win out in complaint against Sunoco

In a preliminary ruling, a Public Utility Commission administrative law judge sided with Wilmer Baker, saying Sunoco should do more to make sure people living near pipelines are safe.
By Katie Meyer

Demonstrators gather on the steps of the state capitol in Harrisburg to demand action on climate change on Friday, September 20, 2019.
Updated: November 14, 2019 | 10:55 am

State Auditor General: Climate change could be costing Pa. hundreds of millions

Eugene DePasquale wants lawmakers to come up with a more comprehensive plan to improve infrastructure, and hopefully prevent future damage from severe weather.
By Katie Meyer

Wolf speaks to reporters after an event in Camp Hill on Nov. 13.

Wolf says he’s unaware of any wrongdoing in Mariner East pipeline permitting process

The FBI has reportedly opened a corruption investigation into the way the administration issued permits for the multibillion-dollar Mariner East 2.

By Katie Meyer

Sen. Pat Toomey speaks in Harrisburg on Nov. 8, 2019. He sponsored a bill aimed at barring future presidents from banning fracking.

Toomey takes preventative measures as Dems call for fracking bans

Pennsylvania’s Republican U.S. Senator has introduced a resolution he hopes will enable Congress to defeat future presidents’ fracking bans in court.

By Katie Meyer

Activists urge Wolf, again, to shut down the Mariner pipelines

They’re pointing to sinkholes and contaminated wells they’ve seen throughout the building process, and say they’re worried about explosions.
By Katie Meyer

TMI supporters gathered Friday to lament the plant's closure, and the loss of jobs for the area.

With TMI closed, nuclear advocates’ concern shifts to Pa.’s other plants

Those who support nuclear worry that without tax breaks, the plants will be shut out of a competitive energy market
By Katie Meyer
LOAD MORE