Environmentalists challenge grid operator’s new ‘reliability’ regulation

  • Tom Johnson, NJ Spotlight
PPL's Brunner Island three-unit coal-fired plant located on the west bank of the Susquehanna River. A bill recently approved by the state House and Senate would give legislators more time to review Pennsylvania's compliance with federal climate regulations.

AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster

PPL's Brunner Island three-unit coal-fired plant located on the west bank of the Susquehanna River.

via NJ Spotlight
A new rule designed to promote reliability of the power grid is being challenged by a quartet of interest groups saying it increases prices to consumers and hinders clean-energy alternatives.The Sierra Club, Natural Resources Defense Council, Earthjustice, and the Union of Concerned Scientists filed a lawsuit Friday challenging a federal agency’s approval of the new regulation adopted by the operator of the nation’s largest power grid, PJM Interconnection.
The regulation provides power suppliers with more lucrative payments if they agree to provide electricity at times when it may be needed because of high demand, but slams them with stiff penalties if they fail to deliver when called upon.
The controversial regulation was adopted by PJM in the wake of an unusually bitter cold snap in the winter of 2014, when many suppliers were unable to supply power, straining the reliability of the grid. New Jersey officials were not happy with the rule, fearing it could spike prices to consumers. Continue reading at NJ Spotlight.
Up Next

Federal court rules FERC doesn't have to review upstream impacts of LNG