Emily Wendler

Emily Wendler
Emily Wendler joined KOSU in February 2015, following graduate school at the University of Montana. While studying Environmental Science and Natural Resource Journalism with an emphasis on agriculture, a professor introduced her to radio and she fell in love. The Cincinnati native has since reported for KBGA, University of Montana’s college radio station, and Montana’s PBS Newsbrief. She was a finalist in a national in-depth radio reporting competition for an investigatory piece she produced on campus rape. She also produced in-depth reports on wind energy and local food for Montana Public Radio. Since moving to Oklahoma, Emily's work has won many awards and has been featured on NPR's Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Latest by Emily Wendler


The surprising design of a new Tulsa park, where children learn by escaping adults and facing obstacles

On the surface, Tulsa’s spectacular new park looks just like a fancy playground. But it was actually intentionally designed to help kids learn important life skills through play.

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‘Educator caucus’ falls short of election goals, but vows to keep pushing for more school funding

Election Day was the end of an intense, seven-month political fight for Oklahoma teachers, but the “teacher caucus” did not fare as well as some had hoped.

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Educators wary of political hopefuls promising school funding without tax increases

Educators have proven to be a powerful force throughout the primaries and a rising political outsider who opposes a key issue among many teachers is having trouble getting their support.

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Educators see few benefits in ballot measure giving schools more financial flexibility

This November, Oklahomans will be asked to vote on State Question 801. This measure gives schools more flexibility in how they can spend their money, but many school leaders say that flexibility won’t improve their financial situation.

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Why some Oklahoma schools are shifting the way they respond to students’ bad behavior

Fifty-four percent of Oklahoma children reported at least one Adverse Childhood Experience, the second highest rate in the country.

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60 years later: Two women remember a teacher and lesson that fueled a movement

For Luper, it was a trip to New York with her students that galvanized her fight against segregation.

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Education and tax vote winning and costing Oklahoma candidates elections

When teachers and school administrators filed for political office in the 2018 election, most were not shy about supporting the first tax increase in nearly three decades, even though it’s a progressive political message in a deeply conservative state. But one teacher won her primary, and beat an incumbent who voted for the tax increase, on the opposite message.

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