Florida

Putting Education Reform To The Test

Miami-Dade Eliminates Most Local Final Exams

Miami-Dade Superintendent Alberto Carvalho said the district is eliminating more than 300 end-of-course exams this year, thanks to a new state law.

John O'Connor / StateImpact Florida

Miami-Dade Superintendent Alberto Carvalho said the district is eliminating more than 300 end-of-course exams this year, thanks to a new state law.

The Miami-Dade School District is taking advantage of a new state law and eliminating more than 300 final tests — also known as end-of-course exams.

The law rescinds a requirement that districts give students a final exam in all subjects that don’t already have a required state exam.

“Today’s announcement should come as welcomed news to everyone who recognizes that too much testing deprives our students of valuable instruction time,” district superintendent Alberto M. Carvalho said in a statement. “In making these decisions, we’ve taken a logical and responsible approach to address the concerns of students, teachers and parents.”

Miami-Dade will give no end-of-course exams to elementary school students this year.

The district will field test 10 middle and high school end-of-course exams, but the results will not have any consequences. Those 10 subjects include five science courses, three history courses and two Spanish courses.

The district will field test new exams each year.

UPDATE: As the Tampa Bay TimesGradebook blog notes, Charlotte and Walton County school districts have also suspended required use of local end-of-course exams.

Florida Not The Only State Having Problems With New Tests

The Hechinger Report details the issues other states have had with new Common Core tests. Florida has had two separate technical issues disrupt testing, while a cyber attack also caused minor problems.


After technology issues stopped the new online tests in Montana, that state’s superintendent told districts that they no longer had to give a test this year. Nevada and North Dakota – which used the same testing company, Measured Progress, to administer the tests – had similar issues.

Meanwhile in New York, over 150,000 students opted not to take that state’s Common Core-aligned tests. And across the country in Portland, Oregon, just about five percent of students opted out of the tests. Federal funding is at risk when more than five percent of students don’t take mandated annual tests, though it is unclear whether or how states or districts will be punished.

Read more at: hechingerreport.org

Orlando-Area District Seeking Permission To Opt Out Of New State Test

The Seminole County school district near Orlando is asking the state for permission to give a test other than the Florida Standards Assessments. The district would like to use the SAT, PSAT and Stanford-10 tests instead, existing tests not created to measure Florida’s Common Core-based standards.


The board’s attorney, Serita Beamon, said just skipping FSA wasn’t a legal option since state law makes testing mandatory.
cComments

Bold move, but futile. The house of cards tumbles if Rick and the DOE allow anything remotely like this, and too many companies are making too much money to allow such a defection.
hstorm
at 6:06 AM April 22, 2015

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But Superintendent Walt Griffin suggested finding out if the district can opt out of FSA and give other tests, such as the Stanford-10 for elementary students and the PSAT and SAT for middle and high school students. Those exams, Griffin said, have been around for years, are considered reliable and are paper-and-pencil exams that take less time to administer than online exams.

Monday, he added, “was one of the most frustrating days” since many students ended up sitting in computer labs waiting to take FSA reading and math exams only to find they could not log in to the state’s testing system. They eventually went back to class, Griffin said, but that created school-wide disruptions. Seminole High School in Sanford had to reschedule online tests for about 740 students.

Read more at: www.orlandosentinel.com

A New Round Of Technical Problems With Florida’s Online Test

Florida students again had problems taking Florida’s new online exam on Monday. State education officials say the problem was created by test contractor American Institutes for Research.


Testing on Monday was canceled in some of the state’s largest counties, including Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach. Some counties reportedly resumed in the afternoon after the problems, which prevented students from logging on, were fixed.

A company spokesman said in an email that AIR installed new servers for grading tests over the weekend, causing the Monday meltdown. Additionally, the company didn’t follow its own protocol to implement and test the installation.

In a statement, AIR took “full responsibility” for the glitches and apologized.

Read more at: www.miamiherald.com

New Broward College Program Wants To Train Young Artists And Designers

A storyboard created by a student in Broward College's Visual Arts and Design Academy.

John O'Connor / StateImpact Florida

A storyboard created by Claudia Morell, a student in Broward College's Visual Arts and Design Academy.

A new program at Broward College has just eight students and seeks to train the next generation of South Florida artists and designers.

The school hopes to earn a national certification for the Visual Arts and Design Academy this spring – becoming the first community college in the South to have that.

Florida’s higher education system has put a focus on training workers for health care and other high-demand fields in recent years. And lawmakers have encouraged school districts to start career-training programs.

But the National Endowment for the Arts estimates the arts contribute $500 billion to the nation’s economy each year. And leaders of the Broward College program argue the arts and technology are tied together.

“People don’t realize the relationship, frequently, between science and art,” said Broward College art professor Leo Stitsky. “If we do away with pure science there would be no computer. If we do away with art there would be no Apple.”

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Teachers And Parents Say Criticism Of Miami-Dade Schools Comes With A Cost

Parents and teachers who have publicly criticized the Miami-Dade school district say they feel the district has tried to squelch dissent. The school district regularly calls people who have signed up to speak at school board meeting. District staff says they’re trying to address concerns.


Teachers and parents say some of the district’s tactics can be subtle. To speak at board meetings, for example, the district asks people to sign up days in advance and list their topic. Those who do usually get a call from the district ahead of time. Some describe the calls as an attempt to talk speakers out of airing complaints as cameras roll.

Other teachers also have reported what they view as pressure from higher ups, including Superintendent Alberto Carvalho, after speaking up.

District leaders counter that they are simply trying to solve problems or follow up on them — an approach they contend has helped improve Miami-Dade’s academic standing and reputation.

Read more at: www.miamiherald.com

Gov. Scott Signs Bill Limiting Testing

Gov. Rick Scott has signed a bill eliminating some 11th grade tests and capping the total testing time for all students. Critics of testing say the bill doesn’t go far enough, and that this year’s test results should have no consequences.


Scott conceded that there was still work to be done.

“I agree with many teachers and parents who say we have too many tests, and while this legislation is a great step forward, we will keep working to make sure Florida students are not over tested,” he said in a statement.

Rita Solnet, one of the founders of the group Parents Across America, said Scott should consider signing an executive order holding students harmless during the transition to new standards and exams.

Read more at: www.tampabay.com

Required Financial Literacy Course Gets Second Chance in Florida Senate

The Florida Council on Economic Education says personal bankruptcies have increased 2200 percent in the last 40 years. That’s one reason why the council is leading a campaign called Require The Money Course.

Trianons Oficial/flickr

The Florida Council on Economic Education says personal bankruptcies have increased 2200 percent in the last 40 years. That’s one reason why the council is leading a campaign called Require The Money Course.

Bills filed in the Florida House and Senate would require high school students to take a one-semester financial literacy course. But with just three weeks left in the legislative session, the proposals (House bill 29 and Senate bill 92)  haven’t been discussed by committees.

Now, there’s another option in the Florida Senate to get the class into high schools if the legislative proposals fail. An alternative is now part of the Senate budget plan for the state starting in July. It would create a required financial literacy pilot project in Broward County schools and a grant program that would enable other districts to participate.

A survey by the National Foundation for Credit Counseling finds about three-quarters of Americans think they would benefit from professional help with their everyday finances.

Criminology major Justin Buis, a junior at Florida State University, has friends who could use the help.

“They have a certain amount of money for a semester and by the time the semester is halfway through, all their money is gone,” Buis says. “They’re living on gas station food or ramen noodles because they don’t know how to manage their money.

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Florida Schools More Likely To Refer Students To Police Than Most States

Florida ranks third in the nation for the number of students schools refer to police and courts, according to an analysis from the Center for Public Integrity. While students aren’t always arrested, the referrals can mean missed school time and have lasting consequences.


Kayleb Moon-Robinson was 11 years old last fall when charges – criminal charges – began piling up at school. Diagnosed as autistic, Kayleb was being scolded for misbehavior one day and kicked a trash can at Linkhorne Middle School in Lynchburg, Virginia, in the Blue Ridge Mountains.

Read more at: www.publicintegrity.org

Evaluating Florida’s University Performance Funding Formula

Florida’s attempt to fund universities based on objective goals is sometimes a little less than objective, Inside Higher Ed reports. The one-size-fits-all formula has judged the state’s highly-rated liberal arts school and its historically black university the harshest.


The best-laid plans often go awry. And in the case of Florida’s performance-based funding model, even the most formula-based system can turn, at times, into something less than an objective process.
In the two years since the 10-metric system took effect, there have been scoring ties that affect which universities finish in the top and bottom groups. More importantly, those top and bottom classifications influence how much — if any — of millions of performance-based dollars universities can claim. So far, the institutions that have lost out on award money are small regional universities, the state’s only liberal arts college and the state’s only public historically black institution.

Read more at: www.insidehighered.com

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