What’s your question about Biden’s climate plan? Ask, and we’ll get an expert to answer

President Biden’s climate plans have been called the most ambitious in history.

What do you want to know about the infrastructure plans and the country’s transition to a low-carbon economy? 

StateImpact Pennsylvania and The Allegheny Front are assembling a group of experts to answer your questions about the energy transition on topics like clean energy, climate change, labor economics, what to do about fossil fuel workers, electrifying the vehicle fleet, decarbonizing the electric grid, and more. You can submit a question in the form below.

The experts will include:

  • Akshaya Jha, Assistant Professor of Economics and Public Policy, Carnegie Mellon University. He studies how different environmental policies work to achieve reduced greenhouse gas emissions.
  • Destenie Nock, Assistant Professor of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University. She studies energy justice, environmental justice, decision analysis, and the intersection of energy, poverty and climate change.
  • Beverly A. Scott, Ph.D., Transportation Expert, CEO, Beverly Scott Associates, LLC and Founder of Introducing Youth to American Infrastructure, Inc. She speaks about investing in smart, next generation infrastructure to advance American competitiveness, sustainable outcomes, and “shared prosperity.”
  • Christina Simeone, Ph.D. student in advanced energy systems at the Colorado School of Mines and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. She is the former director of policy and external affairs at the Kleinman Center for Energy Policy at the University of Pennsylvania and director of the PennFuture Energy Center for Enterprise and the Environment.
  • Richard Alley, climate scientist and Evan Pugh University Professor of Geosciences at Penn State. Alley studies polar ice sheets and has participated in the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

We’ll match experts with selected questions in the fields of economics, policy, and technology, and we’ll publish their answers. Ask your question here:

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