Government Help Hard to Come By for Those Wanting Tornado Shelters

Wiley Robison shows off the new tornado shelter outside his home near Jay, Okla.

Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

Wiley Robison shows off the new tornado shelter outside his home near Jay, Okla.

When Wiley Robison saw the devastation in Moore on May 20th, he decided he needed a storm shelter right then. For him, it was easy. He lives in rural Delaware County, on Cherokee land. No building permit was required for his shelter, and the tribe has a program to help its citizens with the costs.

But Robison’s experience is not the norm. Most cities and towns require permits. How difficult they are to get depends on where you live.


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