Oklahoma

Economy, Energy, Natural Resources: Policy to People

Public Shelter Policy in Oklahoma: Yes for Nukes, No for Natural Disasters

Oklahoma had licensed more than a half-million public shelters in the mid-'60s, like this one in  Post Office in Sapulpa.

Fallsroad / Flickr

Oklahoma had licensed more than a half-million public shelters in the mid-'60s, like this one in a Post Office in Sapulpa.

When tornado sirens sound, Oklahomans are on their own.

State leaders encourage people to stay put where they are. But that’s a big change from days many Oklahomans can still remember, when community shelters were seen as crucial to protecting the public from a very different type of disaster.


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Comments

  • joe

    I feel like I’m missing something, but Joe, at the end of that segment, says,”The storm that leveled Moore on May 20th dwarfed Hiroshima.” If he means that like it sounds, he’s really, really wrong.

    • http://stateimpact.npr.org/oklahoma Joe Wertz

      Thanks for the comment! Scientists say the energy released in the Moore storm was bigger than the power released in the nuclear bomb dropped on Hiroshima.

      From the Associated Press: “Wind, humidity and rainfall combined precisely to create the massive killer tornado in Moore, Okla. And when they did, the awesome amount of energy released over that city dwarfed the power of the atomic bomb that leveled Hiroshima.”

      Here’s a link:

      http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/Latest-News-Wires/2013/0521/Oklahoma-tornado-was-stronger-than-Hiroshima-bomb-How

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