Florida

Putting Education Reform To The Test

FCAT Writing Scores Show Improvement

Florida Department of Education

Scores from the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test have been released. The test is being phased out to make way for new Common Core assessments.

The Florida Department of Education (DOE) has posted the results of FCAT 2.0 Writing and 3rd Grade FCAT 2.0 Reading and Mathematics assessments.

Overall, FCAT 2.0 Writing in grades 4, 8 and 10 improved.

Students don’t need to pass the writing test to advance to the next grade. But, the percentage of students scoring at least a 3.5 – on a scale of 1 to 6 – is used to calculate school grades.

The results for 2013 show students who scored a 3.5 and above increased by 4 percentage points over last year, and those scoring at 4.0 and above increased by 5 percentage points.

DOE shows a breakdown of scores based on race/ethnicity, with white students performing better overall than their Hispanic and African-American counterparts.

The scores also show improvements for English Language Learners and Students with Disabilities.

FCAT 2.0 Writing

Statewide Subgroup Comparison, 2012-2013

Grades 4, 8, and 10

Score Point 3.0 and    Above

Score Point 3.5 and Above

Score Point 4.0 and Above

2012

2013

2012

2013

2012

2013

All Students

81%

82%

54%

58%

33%

38%

White

83%

84%

59%

62%

38%

42%

African-American

76%

79%

43%

49%

23%

28%

Hispanic

81%

83%

52%

56%

30%

36%

Students with Disabilities

55%

58%

27%

31%

13%

16%

English Language Learners

57%

59%

27%

31%

12%

15%

Click here to check each county’s performance. Individual schools are also listed.

Did you know the FCAT is going away? Check out StateImpact Florida’s parents guide to how new standardized tests coming in 2015 are different from the FCAT.

 

Comments

  • Me

    The last time I checked with the DOE, Hispanic was an ethnicity and a Hispanic person can declare themselves as white, black, etc. It is fact that most Hispanics declare themselves as white racially. Just because DOE separates the scores by these terms does not mean that whites outscored Hispanics on average. The DOE’s version of Hispanics could mean those Hispanics that did not declare a race. This is a significantly small number of people. For the writer to then say that whites outscored Hispanics and not specify the numbers ignores scholarship. How many Hispanics are there in this pool who are not also declared white? This nonsense has to stop. An article on education that lacks education.

    • Gina Jordan

      Thanks for your input. I added a graph to show how DOE breaks down the “subgroups” and compares them.

      • Me

        Thank you for the numbers. Here is an example of misleading figures from when I was a classroom teacher. In a classroom with 15 students from Spanish speaking countries, this is a typical self declaration: Five – declare white non-Hispanic, eight – declare Hispanic, and two – declare black (AA). All 15 have very recent Spanish speaking lineage. Therefore the numbers lie. Some of the smartest Hispanics declare themselves white for whatever reason. Since Hispanic is an ethnicity and not a race then the designation becomes much and the stats above are totally not reliable for comparing whites to Hispanics. I hope this makes sense to you and I hope that people reading learn to understand that you cannot draw a conclusion that whites are outperforming Hispanics. Its not even possible in our society as long as Hispanic is not considered a race.

        • Concerned

          What does this have to do with anything, very bias!

  • Erin

    Another thing you might want to add to your bar graph is the fact that scoring a 3.0 on the writing test really means nothing. The “passing grade” for this test is 3.5 so the information in the first column will not be statistically important until you break it down. Once you break it down, you can then possibly observe that around 80% of fourth and eighth graders still did not pass the state test. Seen in that light, your headline about “improvement” is shoddy reporting.

    • Gina Jordan

      Hi Erin,

      Here’s some more information about writing scores. During the conference
      call with DOE, this question was asked by a reporter: “Is there no determination of what is satisfactory or ‘at grade level’ for a writing
      score at this point in time?” The answer from K-12 Chancellor Pam
      Stewart: “That has not been set. The state board only sets the
      standard for the school grade calculation.” The standard is set at 3.5.

      Technically, there is no passing score for FCAT 2.0 Writing. That information can be found here: http://fcat.fldoe.org/fcat2/pdf/13fcat2writing.pdf

      57% of 4th graders scored a 3.5 or above – a 9 point improvement from last year. 54% of 8th graders scored a 3.5 or above – a 2 point improvement from last year.

  • Parent

    So why did you put the 3.0 column if it means nothing! It’s seems we want to show that more students failed than passed. Talk about killing a child’s self esteem… Spare us the hope and stick to the 3.5 and up column.

  • me

    i am Hispanic and on writing fcat I got a 4.0

    • Concerned

      This data is to show improvement on scores based upon reported data!
      Race is not he issue!

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