Constitution pipeline puts pressure on landowners

  • Marie Cusick

The dotted black circle shows the gas supply area in Susquehanna County. The red line is the path of the Constitution Pipeline.

The dotted black circle shows the gas supply area in Susquehanna County. The red line is the path of the Constitution Pipeline. FERC


The Albany Times Union reports the developers of an interstate gas pipeline have sent letters to landowners along the route threatening to use eminent domain.
Last week, federal regulators gave final approval to the Constitution pipeline. The 124 mile, 30-inch line will connect gas in Susquehanna County to existing transmission lines in New York. It will be operated by subsidiaries of Williams Partners, Cabot Oil and Gas, Piedmont Natural Gas, and WGL Holdings.
From the Times Union:

A copy of the letter, obtained by the Times Union, tells property owners who have refused to sell rights-of-way for the Constitution Pipeline that they have until Wednesday to accept offered prices before developers take them to court to force such sales for possibly less money.
Sent from the Philadelphia office of the national law firm Saul Ewing, the letter also warned that Constitution Pipeline Co.crews can show up on private property, whether owners agree, starting Thursday to conduct surveys or other tests. The company wants pipeline construction to begin early next year so gas can start flowing by winter 2015 or 2016.

The pipeline developers say the line will keep customers in New York and New England from experiencing sticker shock when they get their gas bills next winter. However, this pipeline and other proposed projects have seen a lot of push-back from local communities along the routes.

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