Oklahoma

Environment, Education, Energy: Policy to People

Spurred By Violence In Charlottesville, Oklahoma City Public School Leaders Consider Changing School Names

Oklahoma City Public Schools Superintendent Aurora Lora is considering changing the names of four elementary schools.

Emily Wendler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma City Public Schools Superintendent Aurora Lora is considering changing the names of four elementary schools.

Recent violent events in Charlottesville have spurred Oklahoma City Public School board members to consider the significance of school names like Lee, Jackson, Stand Watie, and Wheeler.

The four schools are named after Confederate Civil War officers, and board members have expressed interest in changing the school names. Continue Reading

Teach First, Train Later: Becoming An Emergency Certified Teacher In Oklahoma

Lindsay Judd will be one of hundreds of emergency certified teachers taking the helm of Oklahoma classrooms this year.

Emily Wendler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Lindsay Judd will be one of hundreds of emergency certified teachers taking the helm of Oklahoma classrooms this year.

Oklahoma schools are becoming more and more reliant on teachers with no training.

A lack of school funding, low pay, and waning morale have driven many of the experienced teachers out of the classroom, or out of the state.

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Alternative to Earthquake-Linked Wastewater Disposal Stirs up Opportunity for Oklahoma’s Oil Industry

Electricians complete last-minute work at Newfield's Barton Water Recycling Facility near Calumet, Okla.

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Electricians complete last-minute work at Newfield's Barton Water Recycling Facility near Calumet, Okla.

A key part in solving the state’s earthquake crisis is the long-term management of an enormous amount of oil-field wastewater likely triggering the shaking. The energy industry is working to solve this billion-barrel-a-year problem, and one promising alternative to risky disposal wells is reusing wastewater instead of pumping it underground.

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EPA Moves to Add Midwest City Site to National List of Most Urgent Hazardous Cleanups

Eagle Industries in Midwest City has a for-lease sign in front of the office. Officials say site hasn't been active since 2010.

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Eagle Industries in Midwest City has a for-lease sign in front of the office. Officials say site hasn't been active since 2010.

The U.S. Environmental Protection agency is moving to add an Oklahoma facility that inspected and repaired aircraft oxygen and fire extinguisher systems to the nation’s list of most polluted hazardous waste sites.

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Software Could Help Cities in Oklahoma Plan for Costly Weather and Climate

Olivia and Carter Kempen playing on a splash pad in Edmond, Okla.

Zoe Travers / KOSU

Olivia and Carter Kempen playing on a splash pad in Edmond, Okla.

People who live in Oklahoma know the state’s weather is hard to predict. Erratic rain, heat and ice, and drought can also devastate government budgets. To combat this, researchers from the University of Oklahoma and Oklahoma State University are using new software to help cities predict these economic strains.

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When School Lets Out and Meals End, Educators Struggle to Feed Students Over the Summer

Heidi De Leon, 18, and her younger brother regularly get free lunch through Oklahoma's summer feeding program.

Emily Wendler / StateImpact

Heidi De Leon, 18, and her younger brother regularly get free lunch through Oklahoma's summer feeding program.

For some low-income children in Oklahoma, summer does not mean vacation and playtime — It means being hungry. The lunch and breakfast these kids receive at school is no longer readily available, so they often go without — or they eat junk food. And while Oklahoma has summer food programs to combat this, there are roadblocks for many children.

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As Cities in Oklahoma Woo Innovative Industries, Researchers Say Schools Are a Weak Link

General Electric's new Oil and Gas Technology Center in Oklahoma City.

VICTOR A. POZADAS / KOSU

General Electric's new Oil and Gas Technology Center in Oklahoma City.

A new report from the Brookings Institution says Oklahoma City is positioned for growth. It says the city has a solid layer of infrastructure essential for development — and diversifying the economy.

But there’s a threat to this development, and that’s a potentially weak workforce. Some researchers say local officials need to ensure schools provide the training innovative companies need. And they need to be doing it now.

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