Ohio

Eye on Education

Will Ohio Flunk Failing Charter Schools?

State school superintendent Richard Ross with Governor Kasich at a charter school in Cleveland.

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State school superintendent Richard Ross with Governor Kasich at a charter school in Cleveland.

The head of the Office of School Choice in Ohio resigned over the weekend, after he admitted he had left some failing grades out of several charter school evaluations.

Critics question whether David Hansen was purposely “scrubbing” the grades to make charter sponsors look good.

Meanwhile, the status of state legislation to crack down on bad charter schools is up in the air.

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Apprenticeships’ Popularity Continues to Grow

Career-tech education and apprenticeships have been reemerging as a viable option for students wanting to explore more hands-on training without taking on a ton of student loans. The New York Times takes a look at one of the most recent facelifts, including where a handful of presidential candidates stand on the programs.


NEWPORT NEWS, Va. – With its gleaming classrooms, sports teams and even a pep squad, the Apprentice School that serves the enormous Navy shipyard here bears little resemblance to a traditional vocational education program. And that is exactly the point.

Read more at: www.nytimes.com

Ohio Dept. of Education Halts Evaluations of Charter Sponsors

Richard Ross in white shirt, Peggy Lehner in blue stripes.

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Richard Ross in white shirt, Peggy Lehner in blue stripes.

The Ohio Department of Education today announced it’s retracting its evaluations of charter school sponsors.

The move comes after a department official admitted he had failed to include the grades of some very low-performing sponsors.

Some of the worst performing charter schools in Ohio are online schools.

But their sponsors, or authorizers, have been getting good evaluations by the Ohio Department of Education.

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Youngstown Mayor Wants to Join District’s New Academic Distress Commission

Youngstown Mayor John McNally, right, along with Democratic state senator Joe Schiavoni at a recent informational meeting about the new legislation.

Amy Hansen / StateImpact

Youngstown Mayor John McNally, right, along with Democratic state senator Joe Schiavoni at a recent informational meeting about the new legislation.

This week, Gov. John Kasich signed into law a new plan allowing for more state intervention in the Youngstown City School District.

The next step is for state and city leaders to appoint a commission that will select a CEO  for the schools.

There are already plans in motion to fill one of the five open commission seats.

Youngstown Mayor John McNally gets to choose one person for the commission.  He doesn’t think it’ll take long to make his appointment—because he intends to nominate himself.

“I think for the only way for the mayor to actually know what is going on with a new CEO position, with the powers that person is going to exercise, and with state control being asserted over the district, I think it’s very important for the mayor to be involved in that process,” he said.

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Ohio’s U.S. Senators Amend Every Child Achieves Act

Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) offered a number of amendments to the Senate education bill.

Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) offered a number of amendments to the Senate education bill.

Ohio’s two U.S. senators were successful in holding off an amendment to the education bill passed Thursday that might have cost Ohio schools $70 million aimed at programs for low-income students.

Senators Sherrod Brown and Rob Portman worked to change it so that new formula for dispersing Title I money requires extra funding, making it unlikely to become active for years.

Brown also added an amendment that would open up for-profit charter schools to more public inspection.

“This is the first time, I believe, that Congress has had any involvement  in making charter schools more transparent, in bringing the community in more, in terms of running these charter schools, and making these charter schools more accountable to the public,” he said.

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Civil Rights Groups Take A Stance on Standardized Testing

As lawmakers continue to debate the future of standardized testing in America, Vox takes a look at how some civil rights groups’ views differ when it comes to the issue of exams.


Civil rights groups are starting to split on one of the most controversial policies in education: standardized testing. National civil rights groups have stood by standardized testing in recent years, arguing it is a way to ensure that disadvantaged students aren’t being neglected.

Read more at: www.vox.com

School Board Says ODE Didn’t Include Some Failing Grades in Charter School Evaluations

The Associate Press reports the state school board claims the Ohio Department of Education violated the law by not including reviews of failing online charter schools in the state’s evaluation system.


State school board members have accused the Ohio Department of Education of breaking the law by throwing failing grades for online schools out of a charter school evaluation. The Plain Dealer in Cleveland reports that officials confirmed Tuesday that School Choice Director David Hansen left failing grades for those schools out of the evaluations of charter school oversight agencies.

Read more at: www.dispatch.com

Ohio Offers Performance-based Bonus Education Money

Richard Ross, Ohio Superintendent of Public Instruction

urycki

Richard Ross, Ohio Superintendent of Public Instruction

The $10 billion state budget worked out by the Ohio legislature two weeks ago puts more money into education than Gov. John Kasich’s spending plan.

And, for the first time, the education plan includes a funding bonus based on school performance.

The governor’s proposal to provide more money for poor districts and less money for rich districts was eliminated by the legislative conference committee.

The spending document also includes an award for performance.

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State Pilot Program Offers Dropouts Another Chance to Earn High School Diplomas

Five schools in Ohio will now offer more than one million adults the chance to earn a high school diploma, along with some type of industry credential in fields like oil and healthcare, the Canton Repository reports.


A new program being piloted at five sites in Ohio, including at Stark State College, will give the roughly 1.1 million adults in Ohio who lack a high school diploma an opportunity to not only obtain a high school diploma, but at the same time earn an industry credential in a high-demand field, such as healthcare and oil and gas.

Read more at: www.cantonrep.com

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