Oklahoma

Economy, Energy, Natural Resources: Policy to People

Is Oklahoma’s Severe Weather Policy Grounded in Fact or Folklore?

Cloud to ground lightning strikes near storm chasers during a tornado thunderstorm in Cushing, Okla., on May 31.

Gene Blevins / Reuters/Landov

Cloud to ground lightning strikes near storm chasers during a tornado thunderstorm in Cushing, Okla., on May 31.

Since the deadly tornadoes that struck the state this spring, StateImpact has been taking a look at Oklahoma’s severe weather policy, and asking questions:

Why aren’t there more safe rooms in schools?

What financial help is available for those needing a shelter at home?

And should buildings codes be changed to provide more tornado resistance?


StateImpact Oklahoma is a partnership among Oklahoma’s public radio stations and relies on contributions from readers and listeners to fulfill its mission of public service to Oklahoma and beyond. Donate online.

Comments

  • Kate

    Sick of audio and video. Wish you had a story here instead of a link to an audio story. Reading is faster than watching/listening.

    • http://stateimpact.npr.org/oklahoma Joe Wertz

      We hear you! And don’t worry, @de130d1ec1cd139c0ee05dbfe322ca35:disqus: We’re going to break it all down with a series of reading-friendly posts, which will start tomorrow!

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