Ohio

Eye on Education

Amy Hansen

Broadcast Reporter

Amy Hansen is an education reporter/producer for StateImpact Ohio. Amy previously was an enterprise reporter for The Beaver County Times in Western Pennsylvania, where she covered in-depth community issues such as hunger and homelessness. Amy has also worked for WGBH’s FRONTLINE and The Boston Herald. The Pittsburgh native holds an M.A. in Broadcast Journalism from Emerson College, where she was the 2013 Journalism Graduate Student of the Year, along with a B.A. in Mass Media Communications from The University of Akron.

  • Email: amy.hansen@ideastream.org
  • Twitter: @_AmyHansen

OU Student Uses Ice Bucket Challenge To Urge University to Cut Ties with Israel

Ohio University president Roderick McDavis recently challenged his counterpart in the school’s student senate, Megan Marzec, to raise awareness and money for Lou Gehrig’s disease through the “ALS Ice Bucket Challenge.” But instead of pouring ice over her head like the viral video craze typically indicates, she dumped fake blood on herself. The move, she says, was to support Palestinians and urge the university to cut any ties with Israel. Inside Higher Ed reports her response has caused quite the debate, both on campus and off.


Last month, Ohio University’s president, Roderick McDavis, invited the university’s Student Senate president to participate in the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, a viral campaign raising money and awareness for Lou Gehrig’s Disease. The student president, Megan Marzec, accepted the challenge.

Read more at: www.insidehighered.com

The Different Paths to Becoming A Teacher

Have three years of work experience and a bachelor’s degree with a B average? If so, and you’re up to taking a content test and enrolling in a program to hone some teaching skills, then you can become an educator in Indiana. These teachers are technically called “career specialists,” NPR’s education team reports, and can act as a way to address teacher shortages. There’s a handful of these options nationwide, but those involved with traditional teacher education programs are feeling concerned over this new route.


Hey, you there. You have a college degree? How’d you like to be a teacher? Indiana has just approved a license that clears a new pathway to the teaching profession.

Read more at: www.npr.org

2013-14 Ohio School District Report Cards

reportcard

MARSMET491 / FLICKR

It’s not just students who receive report cards. School districts earn them, too.

To calculate the statewide report cards, officials at the Ohio Department of Education look at a wide variety of data from the state’s schools, including how well students perform on state tests, how many students are actually passing those tests, and if any progress has been made to close achievement gaps.

In the past, districts used to receive blanket labels like “Continuous Improvement” or “Excellent with Distinction” based on their performance. But the ODE has now shifted to ranking nine categories with an A-F grade.  Each district will receive an overall A-F grade by the 2015-16 school year.

Click here to see the 2014 Ohio Report Cards.

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2013-14 Ohio School Building Report Cards

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HO JOHN LEE / FLICKR

Students aren’t the only ones who get report cards. Schools earn them, too.

To calculate the statewide report cards, officials at the Ohio Department of Education look at a wide variety of data from the state’s schools, including how well students perform on state tests, how many students are actually passing those tests, and if any progress has been made to close achievement gaps.

In the past, districts used to receive labels like “Continuous Improvement” or “Excellent with Distinction” based on their performance. But the ODE has now shifted to ranking nine separate categories with an A-F grade. Each district will receive an overall A-F grade by the 2015-16 school year.

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Colorado Adds Health Measurements to School Report Cards

It’s report card day here in Ohio, and many other states follow suit in publishing accountability records to show how districts are performing. But as EdWeek reports, schools in Colorado are required to add a few extra indicators: things like if a school has a nurse, if students have 30 minutes of physical activity, and other health and wellness items. Supporters say moves like this help to increase the connection between a student’s health and their success in the classroom.


When parents in Colorado check state-mandated reports to see how their child’s school is faring academically, they can also quickly learn if that school has a nurse, if it offers 30 minutes of daily physical activity for students, and if it has a school-based health center.

Read more at: www.edweek.org

Steve Jobs Wasn’t A Big Fan of Screen Time for Kids

It wouldn’t be too much of a stretch to think that Apple’s Steve Jobs would dig his kids heavily using high tech products. But one New York Times reporter says that wasn’t quite the case. Actually, a handful of players in the tech field seem to limit how much time their children log in front of screens.

“My kids accuse me and my wife of being fascists and overly concerned about tech, and they say that none of their friends have the same rules,” 3D Robotics’ chief executive Chris Anderson told the Times. “That’s because we have seen the dangers of technology firsthand. I’ve seen it in myself, I don’t want to see that happen to my kids.”


When Steve Jobs was running Apple, he was known to call journalists to either pat them on the back for a recent article or, more often than not, explain how they got it wrong. I was on the receiving end of a few of those calls.

Read more at: www.nytimes.com

Research Finds Middle Class Students Ask for Help More than Their Working Class Peers

Class politics can play out in the classroom, too. Our friends at StateImpact Indiana report a new study finds students of middle class families are more willing to ask for help compared to their peers from working class families. A researcher kept tabs on students for two years and looked at student’s behavior in the classroom, along with talking to parents and teachers, and found middle class parents passed along more direct advice on how students should ask for help at school.


Imagine you’re a fourth grade student, sitting in class, and your teacher is introducing a lesson on multiplying a set of two digit numbers. You’re having trouble following along and know you won’t be able to do the homework on your own.

Read more at: indianapublicmedia.org

Changes Hit Ohio’s Community College Funding Formulas

dollar bill cut in half

Images_of_Money / Flickr

A new law that tweaks the way Ohio’s community colleges earn their state funding went into effect earlier this month.

The state’s 23 community colleges will now earn their chunk of state funding based on the amount of students completing courses and eventually graduating, instead of the number of students enrolled.

It’s similar to the funding model the state’s public four-year models implemented earlier this year.

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Teach for America Mulls Changes

Teach for America, an organization that trains recent college graduates to become educators in low-income schools, has faced a fair amount of criticism since its founding in 1989. Critics say the organization doesn’t place a large enough emphasis on criteria like quality teacher training and long-term placements. But for the first time, the organization is considering changes its “quick-prep, short-commitment” model, Vox reports.


Robert Schwartz loved being a Teach for America teacher. After his two-year commitment to the organization was up, he continued to teach for five more years at Stevenson Middle School in East Los Angeles, where he worked with Latino kids living in poverty. He left the classroom a believer.

Read more at: www.vox.com

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