Ohio

Eye on Education

Grant Money Helps Colleges Lure Minorities Into STEM Majors

molecule graphic

Net_efekt / Flickr

Ohio State University and ten other higher education institutions around Ohio are sharing a $3.5 million grant from the National Science Foundation to recruit minority students into the science, technology, engineering and math fields.

The grant is awarded through the Louis Stokes Alliances for Minority Participation program and creates a partnership among the eleven campuses.

Their goal is to double the number of minority students pursuing STEM degrees over the next five years.

Cuyahoga Community College is one of the schools participating and will make $1,000 stipends available to eligible students this semester.

“We have to produce more workers in this field,” says Belinda Miles, the Provost and Executive Vice President of Academic and Student Affairs at Tri-C.

Miles says Tri-C received a total of $241,264 to spread out over five years.  The college will select 40-50 students to participate and receive the stipends.

“A thousand dollars at our institution goes pretty far,” Miles says. “It can be very helpful in keeping students engaged around campus.”

Students who participate will receive advising and be required to engage in research projects, tutoring and other activities.

The grant is one of several efforts underway around the state to create a pipeline for Ohioans into STEM careers, which are projected to produce thousands more jobs around the country in the next five years.

Participating Ohio campuses include:

  • Central State University
  • Cincinnati State Technical and Community College
  • Cleveland State University
  • Columbus State Community College
  • Cuyahoga Community College
  • Miami University
  • Sinclair Community College
  • The Ohio State University
  • University of Cincinnati
  • Wilberforce University
  • Wright State University

 

Comments

About StateImpact

StateImpact seeks to inform and engage local communities with broadcast and online news focused on how state government decisions affect your lives.
Learn More »

Economy
Education